<div dir="ltr"><div><div>Dear TraMineR Users,<br><br></div>Does anyone know how Gabadinho and Ritschard produced figure 5 of their paper (see link below)? For each group, it has one plot showing three different sequences: the sequence that is most frequent, the sequence with the highest neighborhood density, and the sequence that is most central.<br>
<br></div><div>I can do a plot with one of the three sequences for each group, but I'm not sure how to combine the three into a single plot.<br></div><div><br></div><div></div>Thanks,<br><br>Jeremy <br><div><br><span class="" style="border-collapse:separate;color:rgb(0,0,0);font-family:sans-serif;font-size:13px;font-style:normal;font-variant:normal;font-weight:normal;letter-spacing:normal;line-height:normal;text-indent:0px;text-transform:none;white-space:normal;word-spacing:0px"><p>
Gabadinho A, Ritschard G (2013). "Searching for typical life trajectories applied to child birth histories", In R LÚvy, E. Widmer (eds.),<span class="">á</span><em>Gendered Life Courses</em>, pp. 287-312. Vienna: LIT.</p>
<p><a href="http://mephisto.unige.ch/pub/publications/gr/GabadhinoRitschard-TypicalTrajectories2013.pdf">http://mephisto.unige.ch/pub/publications/gr/GabadhinoRitschard-TypicalTrajectories2013.pdf</a><br></p></span><br><div>
<div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">********************<br>Dr. Jeremy Reynolds<br>Associate Professor<br>Undergraduate Coordinator<br>Department of Sociology<br>116 Baldwin Hall<br>University of Georgia<br>Athens, GA 30602-1611<br>
Phone: (706) 583-8072<br>Web: <a href="http://uga.edu/soc/people/faculty/reynolds_jeremy.php" target="_blank">http://uga.edu/soc/people/faculty/reynolds_jeremy.php</a><br>Fax: (706) 542-4320</div>
</div></div></div></div>